Jaman Edward Dunn Assistant Conductor, Community Engagement

Jaman E. Dunn is an African American orchestral conductor of classical and film music. A native of Chicago, he began his musical studies with the violin at age 8. In addition to the violin, he began playing viola at age 17. He began studying conducting informally at age 12, and began formal studies while in high school. To become a better well-rounded musician, he studied voice at The Ohio State University under Dr. C. Andrew Blosser, earning a Bachelor of Music in Voice Performance. Continuing his conducting activities, he formed the Buckeye Philharmonic while at Ohio State. The Buckeye Philharmonic remains Ohio State’s only orchestra completely student-run and operated. Maestro Dunn recently graduated from The Boston Conservatory at Berklee. There, he earned a Master of Music in Orchestral Conducting, under the tutelage of Maestro Bruce Hangen. While at the Boston Conservatory, he has led the Conductor’s Orchestra in works of Strauss, Brahms, Walton, and Dvořák; and he has assisted the Boston Conservatory Orchestra in works of Mahler, Shostakovich, and Prokofiev. He has also conducted the Boston Conservatory Orchestra in Copland’s Billy the Kid. Separate from his program requirements, Maestro Dunn has conducted self-promoted concerts of Vaughan Williams, Respighi, John Williams, Mendelssohn, and Elgar. Maestro Dunn has also conducted the Berklee Boston Conservatory Recording Orchestra in compositions by rising composers in the fields of classical and film music. In addition to his conducting activities, Maestro Dunn maintains a vocal career as a baritone in both oratorio and operatic repertoire. He has performed extensively in Boston and the Midwest in works of Orff, Handel, Bach, Mendelssohn, Verdi, Mozart, and Rossini, among others. Entering into the professional world of orchestral music, Maestro Dunn looks to secure a position as Music Director of a professional symphony orchestra, as well as continue his vocal career. In doing this, he also hopes to raise awareness of African Americans in classical music; as performers at all levels, and in all mediums.